Good article but you didn’t go over the other part of the Amazon problem. There are different grades of hemp extract that contain CBD, you can have 4000mg of Hemp extract but that doesn’t mean it contains close to 4000mg of CBD, full spectrum hemp extract is available commercially in varying grades from as low as 20% CBD. Someone buying a 4000mg bottle could be getting as little as 800mg CBD, this makes a huge difference when trying to compare oils on a price basis. I wouldn’t buy CBD oil on Amazon from a company you cant find for sale outside of Amazon or that doesn’t even have a website. Its a shame because for people looking to experiment with CBD there are so many different companies out there being completely misleading with what they are selling.
Great article! Excellent point by Matt, precisely why I found this article. I would just add that the CBD percentage in the extract can be significantly lower than even the 20%, but its probably fair to use that to give a rough idea how much CBD might be in an Amazon product, so divide the claimed percentage by 5!. Claims of up to 60% on Amazon are totally ludicrous, any concentration above 20% CBD become darker very viscous and the CBD starts to crystalize in the bottle! You would need to heat the bottle (which can damage the properties of the carrier oil) to re-liquidize! Also beware of Amazon reviews which are notorious for being fake. As author suggests, contact seller for full data sheets or seek a reputable supplier elsewhere that gives full transparency of information up front.
×