As is the case with any plant that constitutes a crop, cannabis plants have been selectively bred over the years to bolster one or another desired characteristic. This means that some plants provide a more potent psychotropic effect, others possess more prominent seeds (used in the production of cooking oil traditionally), while others may make for sturdier textile fibers.
There are more than 80 cannabinoids found in cannabis plants, with THC being the primary one, followed by CBD. However, in the hemp plant, which is a different strain of the species Cannabis sativa, CBD is the main active ingredient, and THC is barely present, making its use and legality more widespread. The reason that CBD is such an effective form of support for human health is due to the body’s endogenous cannabinoid system. This regulatory structure of the body has millions of cannabinoid receptors in the brain and nervous system, which react not only to plant-derived cannabinoids (such as hemp and marijuana) but also to natural cannabinoids produced within our body. When hemp oil is used and processed by the body, it is effectively boosting the function of the endocannabinoid system, helping our body regulate itself in many different ways.
Pure Hemp Botanicals’ mission statement is “compassion in action” – and it’s a pledge that it aims to adhere to not only through the use of organic hemp and cruelty-free ingredients, but also through its employment practices. The company’s “PHD Gives Back” initiative demonstrates a commitment to kindness, too, as 1 percent of proceeds from the sale of its products are donated to non-profit Mercy For Animals. Pure Hemp Botanicals’ range of CBD-containing goods is also varied, taking in as it does concentrates, vape oils and flavored mints and teas. And regular CBD oil users can, furthermore, take advantage of the company’s handy subscription system for tinctures, capsules and softgels – a scheme that’s not only convenient but which, thanks to the discounts available, offers a less costly way to get a CBD hit.
Kevin Sabet, a psychiatrist at the University of Florida’s Drug Policy Institute, presented a six-point plan whose purpose is accelerating officially sanctioned serious research in the properties of cannabidiol and relaxing barriers for private actors interested in the matter, who would nevertheless pursue this avenue in a grayer area and thus, less safe.
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