It’s thought that the endocannabinoid system may be critical for regulating sleep and sleep stability, which make sense, as it promotes balance throughout the body. Research seems to show that when CBD interacts with this system, sufferers may achieve longer periods of overall sleep. Furthermore, earlier research demonstrated that CBD may provide relief for insomnia sufferers who struggle to achieve REM sleep due to anxiety. (33, 34, 35)
What’s all the hype about CBD????. First off I absolutely LOVE CBD oil. The most common questions I get: Is it marijuana? No it doesn’t get you high (no THC). The syringe you use is NOT a shot or an oil you rub on your skin. You put the drops of CBD under your tongue. . CBD oil has a ton of benefits. Research has proven it helps with anxiety & depression, pain reduction and reduces inflammation. In addition to these I have also noticed I feel more calm and less stressed 🤗….in turn I’m able to clear my head, that has helped a ton with my sleep. I’ll do another post soon about friends and family that are seeing benefits of taking CBD. . @gainsinbulk sells their pure CBD oil for $54 with my code BeckyL10 (60 servings). Let me know if you have any questions⬇️

Current protocols include managing ADHD with a combination of behavioral therapy and medications. Numerous medications, both stimulants and non-stimulants, have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat ADHD. Because each individual reacts differently to each medication, finding an appropriate protocol can be a challenge associated with many negative symptoms, including:
As one might expect from the information presented in the previous sections of this article, the position of cannabidiol (both from a medical and from an institutional point of view) is one of uncertainty. To add insult to injury, private companies (especially those targeting immediate profit with a minimum of investment) take advantage of the loopholes in legislation to gain from the media exposure that CBD has had in the past few years.
CBD has been touted for a wide variety of health issues, but the strongest scientific evidence is for its effectiveness in treating some of the cruelest childhood epilepsy syndromes, such as Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), which typically don’t respond to antiseizure medications. In numerous studies, CBD was able to reduce the number of seizures, and in some cases it was able to stop them altogether. Videos of the effects of CBD on these children and their seizures are readily available on the Internet for viewing, and they are quite striking. Recently the FDA approved the first ever cannabis-derived medicine for these conditions, Epidiolex, which contains CBD.
CBD oil is most readily available as a tincture. This can be taken by applying a few drops under your tongue, holding in your mouth for a few moments so it can be absorbed, before swallowing. It can also be added to water or smoothies. A spray form is available (simply spritz under your tongue), as are capsules, gummies, creams that can be applied topically, and e-liquid for vape pens.
CBD is not often marketed as a weight loss aid, but studies show that it does have the potential for helping people to shed excess pounds. Cannabidiol has been heavily researched by independent organizations, and anecdotal evidence on its benefits for weight loss are widely available. Yet, until recently, the federal government persisted in classifying it as a controlled substance, even though it is nonaddictive, non-psychoactive, is not mood altering, and is safer than aspirin.
While CBD and marijuana have been used for centuries for many remedies, the role CBD can play in lessening the severity and number of seizures in those diagnosed with epilepsy came into the spotlight in the early 2000’s. That’s when the Figi family began looking for a way to treat their daughter Charlotte’s seizures. At the time, she was suffering upwards of 300 seizures per week. (8)

I recently was a guest at a medical marijuana educational event that highlighted the work of researcher Michael Backes. During his presentation he made a statement about CBD that I have never heard anywhere else that CBD is “regulating” (my word) the effects of THC. I asked the Nurse Practitioner at the event, Ivy Lou Hibbitt of Certicann.com, what he meant by that and she said it was her understanding of Michael’s comment that he takes CBD to reduce the psychoactive effects of THC. Has this property of CBD, that it can lessen psychoactive effects, ever been researched elsewhere?
The anti-emetic and anti-nausea effect of marijuana is a centuries-old known fact. Nevertheless, as early as twenty years ago, the effect was attributed to the actions of THC. Continuous research into other cannabinoids has proven that many other phytocannabinoids produce the same desired effect. At present, the FDA recommends two drugs featuring cannabinoids, in which CBD has the highest concentration, in the treatment of nausea induced by chemotherapy – nabilone and dronabinol. Though in its infancy, promising studies exist which suggest that one day CBD may be incorporated into cancer therapies.
More recent experiments, involving the administration of a part CBD part THC solution, have yielded results that contradict the first supposition. At present, on the evidence that cannabidiol reduces some of the psychoactive effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (acting as a de facto antidepressant), scientists argue that cannabidiol has a holistic but indirect influence on all cannabinoid receptors in the endocannabinoid system. The main consequence of this impact seems to be an increase in the production of endocannabinoids. This is now the prevailing idea that accounts for the mountains of empirical evidence of how the benefits of cannabidiol are expressed at the cellular level.
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