At the most basic level, CBD interacts with the body’s endocannabinoid system and is widely believed to directly impact the brain’s CB1 receptors – the same receptors that certain anxiety medications interact with – lessening the effects of anxiety and related conditions. This allows sufferers to live more normal lives, free from the constraints of anxiety. That’s just the tip of the iceberg… the positive effects of CBD for anxiety are incredible!
A study published by David Cheng, Postdoctoral Scientist, Neuroscience Research, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia, says that CBD has a potential as a preventive measure against symptoms of Alzheimer’s. This presents yet another exciting development for medical researchers, given the persistent challenges to finding effective solutions for this condition.
Due to the anti-inflammatory properties of cannabidiol, insulin resistance (the chief metabolic problem for patients with type 2 diabetes) is reduced, leading to a better prognosis thanks also to the lower incidence of dead tissue. Ever since the discovery of CBD in the 1990’s, speculation existed to its effect on other types of receptors (not just cannabinoid receptors) which could be manipulated and included in the treatment of some cardiovascular diseases like atherosclerosis. In light of these speculations, researchers at the University of Tel Aviv (walking in the footsteps of the “father” of cannabinoid research, Dr. Raphael Mechoulam) demonstrated a 30 percent blood flow increase in rodents with areas of dead tissue in the heart muscle.[22]
Although CBD oils aren’t regulated by the FDA, purchasing products stateside from one of the nine states where recreational and medical cannabis use is legal will likely result in a higher-quality product than buying one made with hemp-derived CBD oil imported from abroad, says Martin Lee, director of Project CBD, a nonprofit that promotes medical research into CBD.
As is the case with any plant that constitutes a crop, cannabis plants have been selectively bred over the years to bolster one or another desired characteristic. This means that some plants provide a more potent psychotropic effect, others possess more prominent seeds (used in the production of cooking oil traditionally), while others may make for sturdier textile fibers.
CBD’s effect on homeostasis is believed to be why those in need of nutrition can experience an appetite increase and those with excess weight can experience an appetite decrease. The reason for this is that CBD is an adaptogen. Referred to by some scientists as “the boy scout molecule” because it always does the right thing in any given situation. The Journal of  Psychopharmacology tested this theory on rats in 2012. The researchers wanted to see how three common cannabinoids, including CBN, CBD, and CBG, affected the appetite of the rats. The study concluded that both CBD and CBG worked to reduce the rat’s appetite.

More recent experiments, involving the administration of a part CBD part THC solution, have yielded results that contradict the first supposition. At present, on the evidence that cannabidiol reduces some of the psychoactive effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (acting as a de facto antidepressant), scientists argue that cannabidiol has a holistic but indirect influence on all cannabinoid receptors in the endocannabinoid system. The main consequence of this impact seems to be an increase in the production of endocannabinoids. This is now the prevailing idea that accounts for the mountains of empirical evidence of how the benefits of cannabidiol are expressed at the cellular level.

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