This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
The list of cannabinoids currently comprises 113 entries, with more and more additions each year. Of these 113, by far the best documented are tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol (in this order), with the two also being the most abundant constituents of the cannabis plant. In a typical chemical isolation process, cannabidiol makes up a little under half of the entire extract.
The immediate and powerful effects of THC are explained because of the special affinity it has with the CB1 type receptors, which mediate crucial processes in the brain. The less prominent (but no less important) action of CBD was explained, at least for a while, by hypothesizing that it binds to CB2 type receptors, hence its more diffuse manner of exercising changes in the body. Early on, the antipsychotic effects of cannabidiol were observed, an aspect which seemed to be in consonance with this initial hypothesis.
Most traditional treatments come with side effects that – in many cases – seem worse (or just as terrible) as the anxiety itself. These side effects range from mood altering effects like depression, to weight gain or loss, to dependence (the need for higher doses to achieve the same effect and avoid withdrawal symptoms)… the side effects are often a deterrent. Only around 36.9 percent of anxiety sufferers receive treatment for their condition.

Naturally, the testimonies of these experts were based on a comprehensive literature review, an endeavor which we have also undertaken, albeit in a less official capacity. While many new products have been hailed as a panacea in their times, and many web sources certainly allude to this status for CBD, our objective was more modest – presenting ten possible benefits of cannabidiol where sufficient evidence exists to back up the claims.
Lisa Hamilton, a jeweler and doula in Brooklyn, NY, knows about the side effects. She recently tried CBD for the shoulder pain that plagued her five years after an accident. Her doctor certified that she was in chronic pain, which under New York State law allowed her to buy from a state dispensary. One Friday, she swallowed two 10-mg capsules, the amount recommended at the dispensary, then took another two on Saturday. “By Sunday, it felt like I’d gotten hit by a truck. Every muscle and joint ached,” Hamilton says. She cut back to one pill a day the following week, but still felt hungover. She stopped after that.
CBD may be sold in oils or tinctures. Tinctures are normally sold in small dropper bottles. You can drop a couple of drops of the tincture underneath your tongue, which allows the liquid to be absorbed directly into your bloodstream. This makes tinctures more potent than ingesting this phytocannabinoid in a different way because the drops do not have to go through the process of digestion before they enter your bloodstream.

CBD may offer an option for treating different types of chronic pain. A study from the European Journal of Pain showed, using an animal model, CBD applied on the skin could help lower pain and inflammation due to arthritis. Another study demonstrated the mechanism by which CBD inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic pain, two of the most difficult types of chronic pain to treat. More study in humans is needed in this area to substantiate the claims of CBD proponents about pain control.


Unlike THC, CBD will not make you high. That said, this doesn’t mean CBD is not at all psychoactive, as many assert, says Jahan Marcu, PhD, director of experimental pharmacology and behavior at the International Research Center on Cannabis and Mental Health in New York City: “CBD does change cognition. It affects mood, which is why people take it for anxiety. And some find that it makes them more alert.”


CBD MD offers gummies that contain grade-A premium CBD. The cannabinoid extract is full-spectrum, so it contains other cannabinoids such as CBDV and CBG. This product also contains a variety of molecules, terpenes, essential oils, and amino acids to enhance the flavor and the health-promoting benefits. These gummies are 100 percent organic, non-GMO, vegan, and gluten-free. The CBD used to create them has been sourced from organically grown domestic hemp. 

At the most basic level, CBD interacts with the body’s endocannabinoid system and is widely believed to directly impact the brain’s CB1 receptors – the same receptors that certain anxiety medications interact with – lessening the effects of anxiety and related conditions. This allows sufferers to live more normal lives, free from the constraints of anxiety. That’s just the tip of the iceberg… the positive effects of CBD for anxiety are incredible!

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