You’ve most likely heard of CBD. It is becoming an increasingly popular choice for an array of health complaints and conditions. It is one of 104 cannabinoids, which are specific chemical compounds found in the Cannabis sativa plant. Unlike its sister cannabinoid, THC, CBD provides all the benefits of Cannabis without the psychoactive effects. In other words, it won’t make you high. While many full-spectrum CBD oils contain trace amounts of THC, the amount is negligible and has no noticeable effects.

To my understanding, neither CBD nor THC are effective for “severe” pain; rather, they work better for mild to moderate chronic pain. Often, with severe pain, the dosage of opiates can be decreased with concomitant use of medical cannabis or CBD and that decrease in dose makes their use safer. Concurrent use of THC does increase the analgesic effect of CBD, but it also adds the “high” which some people do not want as a side effect.
CBD and other cannabinoids attach to specific receptors in the body found within what is referred to as the endocannabinoid system. In fact, up until recently, scientists didn’t know that these cannabinoids are actually naturally produced in humans and most animals. Some researchers speculate that an endocannabinoid deficiency may be the cause of many disorders and conditions. When CBD is introduced into the body, it binds to receptor cells called CB1 and CB2 receptors.

I’ve been using their natural oil for about a week now, and I thoroughly enjoy it. Recently, however, I got my wife a small bottle of their mint flavored CBD oil, and she loves it. She never cared for the natural hemp taste. For those of you who are interested, it also comes in a citrus flavor. I had the opportunity to sample that once and was not disappointed.


Cannabis has always been a popular form of treatment for a variety of medical conditions, but in the 1930’s growing concerns about the dangers of marijuana abuse led to cannabinoids being banned. A century has past and despite all efforts from cannabis enthusiasts through social media channels and online media, cannabis is still classed as a schedule 1 drug.


CBD is the major non-euphorigenic component of Cannabis sativa. Some research is beginning to show that CBD is different than other well-studied cannabinoids. All cannabinoids function as ligands, meaning they dock onto the binding site of a protein and have the ability to modulate a receptor’s behavior. CB1 receptors are widely distributed, but are particularly abundant in areas of the brain, including those concerned with movement, coordination, sensory perception, emotion, memory, cognition, autonomic and endocrine functions.
It’s believed that while CBD helps activate and regulate the body’s endocannabinoid system, it also helps regulate the neural pathways that are responsible for withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings. In early rat trials, those treated with CBD were less likely to exhibit anxiety-related withdrawal symptoms and drug-seeking behaviors after being exposed to cocaine. (40)

‘I recommend starting with a low dose and slowly building up over a few weeks, to find the dose that works best for you,’ agrees Dr Brewer. ‘For example, start with Healthspan High Strength CBD Oil 6.4mg Capsules, taking one to three daily. Then, if needed, move up to Super Strength CBD 15mg Capsules, taking one to two daily. CBD is not psychoactive and is not addictive. I prefer capsules, as CBD drops have a strong taste, although filter-clear peppermint flavoured drops are available.’

Nevertheless, as populations age all across the globe, constant pain brought on by chronic illnesses in the elderly will surely become a matter of public health and compassion. A 2008 study inquired on the efficacy of cannabinoids other than THC in pain management. Painkillers with cannabinoids proved to be well tolerated, with minimum side-effects, and a prospect for low long-term toxicity. Furthermore, a combination of cannabidiol and opioids is thought to be the breakthrough of the future in palliative care.[24]


More recent experiments, involving the administration of a part CBD part THC solution, have yielded results that contradict the first supposition. At present, on the evidence that cannabidiol reduces some of the psychoactive effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (acting as a de facto antidepressant), scientists argue that cannabidiol has a holistic but indirect influence on all cannabinoid receptors in the endocannabinoid system. The main consequence of this impact seems to be an increase in the production of endocannabinoids. This is now the prevailing idea that accounts for the mountains of empirical evidence of how the benefits of cannabidiol are expressed at the cellular level.
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